Dr Lillian Smyth

BA, BSc(Hons), PhD (ANU)
Senior Lecturer in Medical Education, ANU Medical School
ANU College of Health and Medicine

I am an educational psychology researcher and Senior Lecturer in medical education in the Medical Education Unit. My research interests focus on social and educational psychology, working mainly on social influence, perceived norms and applications of social psychological theory to teaching and learning. Current projects explore tertiary learning approaches, academic discipline differences, research-led education, medical education, music education and the relationship between social identification and learning behaviour.

Research interests

Dr Smyth's research interests focus on social and educational psychology, working mainly on self-structure, social influence, perceived norms and applications of social psychological theory to teaching and learning.
 

Current student projects

HDR:

  • Katrina Rivera (PhD candidate). Performance anxiety in music: a necessary evil?
  • Sarah Walker (MPhil candidate). Access is success, and other lies that we've been told

MChD Research Projects:

  • Lara Ollis.  Engagement, e-learning and student wellbeing during COVID-19
  • Riley Attard. Engagement, e-learning and academic performance during COVID-19

Groups

  • Smyth, L, Carter, J, Valter-Kocsi, K et al. 2020, 'Examining the Short-, Medium-, and Long-Term Success of an Embodied Learning Activity in the Study of Hand Anatomy for Clinical Application [IN PRESS]', Anatomical Sciences Education, vol. online.
  • O'Rourke, J, Smyth, L, Webb, A et al 2020, 'How Can We Show You, If You Can't See It? Trialing the Use of an Interactive Three-Dimensional Micro-CT Model in Medical Education', Anatomical Sciences Education, vol. 13, no. 2, pp. 206-217.
  • Burgis-Kasthala, S, Elmitt, N, Smyth, L et al 2019, 'Predicting future performance in medical students. A longitudinal study examining the effects of resilience on low and higher performing students', Medical Teacher, vol. 41, no. 10, pp. 1184-1191.
  • Smyth, L, Mavor, K & Gray, L 2019, 'Not just who you are, but who you were before: Social identification, identity incompatibility, and performance-undermining learning behaviour in higher education', Journal of Community and Applied Social Psychology, vol. 29, no. 6, pp. 474-491.
  • Smyth, L, Mavor, K & Platow, M 2019, 'Social identification and academic performance: integrating two existing models of tertiary student learning', Educational Psychology: An International Journal of Experimental Educational Psychology, vol. 39, no. 3, pp. 409-425.
  • Smyth, L, Chandra, V & Mavor, K 2018, 'Social identification and normative conflict: When student and educator learning norms collide', Journal of Applied Social Psychology, vol. 48, no. 6, pp. 293-303.
  • Smyth, L, Mavor, K, Platow, M et al 2017, 'Understanding Social Identity in Education', in Mavor, K., Platow, M., Bizumic, B. (ed.), Self and Social Identity in Educational Contexts, Routledge, London, pp. 223-239pp.
  • Smyth, L, Mavor, K & Platow, M 2017, 'Learning behaviour and learning outcomes: the roles for social influence and field of study', Social Psychology of Education, vol. 20, no. 1, pp. 69-95pp.
  • McNeill, K, Smyth, L & Mavor, K 2017, 'The complexity of medical education: Social identity and normative influence in well-being and approaches to learning', in Mavor, K., Platow, M., Bizumic, B. (ed.), Self and Social Identity in Educational Contexts, Routledge, London, pp. 320-341.
  • Smyth, L, Davila Cisneros, F, Sloan, T et al 2016, 'How science really works: the student experience of research-led education', Higher Education, vol. 72, no. 2, pp. 191-207.
  • Smyth, L, Mavor, K, Platow, M et al 2015, 'Discipline social identification, study norms and learning approach in university students', Educational Psychology: An International Journal of Experimental Educational Psychology, vol. 35, no. 1, pp. 53-72.
  • Skorich, D, Webb, H, Stewart, L et al 2013, 'Stereotype threat and hazard perception among provisional license drivers', Accident Analysis and Prevention, vol. 54, pp. 39-45.

Supervised students